Green Lantern Review: Superhero Film of the Summer? I think not…..

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I have to say I am very disappointed with Green Lantern. It was shaping up to be THE superhero film of the summer, but instead it turned out to be loud, somewhat dull, and lacking in emotion. While it boasts several impressive action sequences and some pretty cool special effects, it is plagued by uninteresting characters and a poor script. Green Lantern reigns supreme as the summer’s biggest disappointment.

Irresponsible test pilot, Hal Jordan, has been labeled a disappointment his entire life. His childhood friend and love interest, Carol Ferris, believes he walks away from everything he starts. This changes when he encounters a dying alien named Abin Sur, who presents him with a mysterious ring. With his dying breath, Abin Sur tells a confused Hal that the ring chose him, and that with it comes great responsibility. Shortly after this strange encounter, Hal discovers the ring’s true power while fighting three men in an alley behind a pub. He is then transported to the distant planet Oa, home of the Green Lantern Corps. Upon his arrival, Hal is trained by the leader of the Green Lanterns, Sinestro, and two of his intergalactic soldiers, Kilowog and Tomar Re. They warn him of an evil entity known as Parallax, who recently broke free from imprisonment and swore vengeance upon the Lanterns. When the evil scientist Hector Hammond acquires powers of his own and summons Parallax to Earth, Hal must find the courage to face the two villains and protect his loved ones.

The acting in this film ranges from poor to mediocre, with the exceptions of Mark Strong as Sinestro and Peter Sarsgaard as Hector Hammond. These two pull off their respective roles brilliantly, but neither gets enough screen time to really make an impact on audiences. Ryan Reynolds fails miserably in his role as Hal Jordan, and I really wish the filmmakers had picked someone more talented to take on such a demanding role. Throughout the entire film, Reynolds wears a blank expression on his face no matter what is happening around him. I found his performance to be incredibly dull and I was not invested in his character at all. The gorgeous Blake Lively portrays Hal’s long time friend, Carol Ferris, with about as much conviction as Reynolds plays our hero. The only thing she has going for her here is looking like a million bucks.

 The lack of emotion in this movie astonishes me. It has been a while since I have seen a film as soulless as Green Lantern. When Hal or another major character was in danger, I found myself daring the filmmakers to kill that character off. If the audience does not like or connect with the protagonist or any of the supporting characters, then the filmmakers have already failed in creating an engaging, entertaining experience. Another issue I have with this movie is the script. The dialogue was cheesy, and I don’t think any of the characters had anything incredibly important to say. In addition to this, none of the characters were developed very well. My final issue lies in the film’s primary villain, Parallax. We never find out too much about Parallax, and it really isn’t in much of the movie. Hector, the secondary villain, turns out to be a much more engaging and interesting character. Plus, he gets much more screen time. Personally, I would have preferred it if he had been the main antagonist instead.

The only thing Green Lantern really has going for it is the action sequences. The fact that Hal could think up his weapons using the ring makes things interesting. I think it added  creativity to some fight scenes that otherwise would have been cliché and boring. The special effects used for such scenes impressed me as well.

Overall, Green Lantern is a disappointment as both a superhero film and a film in general. Character development is almost nonexistent, action scenes are thrown in randomly to hold the viewer’s attention, and the acting is mediocre at best. A sequel is probably not a good idea. Is it already time for a reboot?

2 out of 5 stars

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